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  #641  
Old 01-16-2018, 12:04 PM
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This hurt.

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  #642  
Old 01-16-2018, 01:57 PM
Curmudgeonx Curmudgeonx is offline
paris gave me herpes
 

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At least she didn't 'Linger'
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  #643  
Old 01-16-2018, 07:38 PM
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Too soon
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  #644  
Old 01-17-2018, 12:07 PM
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The American racing driver Dan Gurney, age 86





Dan Gurney, the tall, handsome, all-American driver from California, who had success in almost every kind of road racing there is, and who drove in the golden age of Grand Prix and sports car competition in Europe and America, passed away January 14 of complications from pneumonia at the age of 86.


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  #645  
Old 01-20-2018, 04:30 PM
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JesusMartinez JesusMartinez is offline
king shit around these parts
 

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  #646  
Old 01-29-2018, 03:36 AM
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Naomi Parker Fraley, the Real Rosie the Riveter, Dies at 96
By MARGALIT FOX JAN. 22, 2018 New York Times
Daniel E. Slotnik contributed reporting



Unsung for seven decades, the real Rosie the Riveter was a California waitress named Naomi Parker Fraley.

Over the years, a welter of American women have been identified as the model for Rosie, the war worker of 1940s popular culture who became a feminist touchstone in the late 20th century.

Mrs. Fraley, who died on Saturday, at 96, in Longview, Wash., staked the most legitimate claim of all. But because her claim was eclipsed by another woman’s, she went unrecognized for more than 70 years.

“I didn’t want fame or fortune,” Mrs. Fraley told People magazine in 2016, when her connection to Rosie first became public. “But I did want my own identity.”

The search for the real Rosie is the story of one scholar’s six-year intellectual treasure hunt. It is also the story of the construction — and deconstruction — of an American legend.

“It turns out that almost everything we think about Rosie the Riveter is wrong,” that scholar, James J. Kimble, told The Omaha World-Herald in 2016. “Wrong. Wrong. Wrong. Wrong. Wrong.”

For Dr. Kimble, the quest for Rosie, which began in earnest in 2010, “became an obsession,” as he explained in an interview for this obituary in 2016.

Dr. Kimble, an associate professor of communication and the arts at Seton Hall University in New Jersey, reported his findings in “Rosie’s Secret Identity,” a 2016 article in the journal Rhetoric & Public Affairs.

The article brought journalists to Mrs. Fraley’s door at long last.

“The women of this country these days need some icons,” Mrs. Fraley said in the People magazine interview. “If they think I’m one, I’m happy.”

The confusion over Rosie’s identity stems partly from the fact that the name Rosie the Riveter has been applied to more than one cultural artifact.

The first was a wartime song of that name, by Redd Evans and John Jacob Loeb. It told of a munitions worker who “keeps a sharp lookout for sabotage / Sitting up there on the fuselage.” Recorded by the bandleader Kay Kyser and others, it became a hit.

The “Rosie” behind that song is well known: Rosalind P. Walter, a Long Island woman who was a riveter on Corsair fighter planes and is now a philanthropist, most notably a benefactor of public television.

Another Rosie sprang from Norman Rockwell, whose Saturday Evening Post cover of May 29, 1943, depicts a muscular woman in overalls (the name Rosie can be seen on her lunchbox), with a rivet gun on her lap and “Mein Kampf” crushed gleefully underfoot.

Rockwell’s model is known to have been a Vermont woman, Mary Doyle Keefe, who died in 2015.

But in between those two Rosies lay the object of contention: a wartime industrial poster displayed briefly in Westinghouse Electric Corporation plants in 1943.

Rendered in bold graphics and bright primary colors by the Pittsburgh artist J. Howard Miller, it depicts a young woman, clad in a work shirt and polka-dot bandanna. Flexing her arm, she declares, “We Can Do It!”

(In 2017, The New Yorker published an updated Rosie, by Abigail Gray Swartz, on its cover of Feb. 6. It depicted a brown-skinned woman, sporting a pink knitted cap like those worn in recent women’s marches, striking a similar pose.)

Mr. Miller’s poster was never meant for public display. It was intended only to deter absenteeism and strikes among Westinghouse employees in wartime.

For decades his poster remained all but forgotten. Then, in the early 1980s, a copy came to light — most likely from the National Archives in Washington. It quickly became a feminist symbol, and the name Rosie the Riveter was applied retrospectively to the woman it portrayed.

This newly anointed Rosie soon came to be considered the platonic form. It became ubiquitous on T-shirts, coffee mugs, posters and other memorabilia.

The image piqued the attention of women who had done wartime work. Several identified themselves as having been its inspiration.

The most plausible claim seemed to be that of Geraldine Doyle, who in 1942 worked briefly as a metal presser in a Michigan plant. Her claim centered in particular on a 1942 newspaper photograph.

Distributed by the Acme photo agency, the photograph showed a young woman, her hair in a polka-dot bandanna, at an industrial lathe. It was published widely in the spring and summer of 1942, though rarely with a caption identifying the woman or the factory.

In 1984, Mrs. Doyle saw a reprint of that photo in Modern Maturity magazine. She thought it resembled her younger self.

Ten years later, she came across the Miller poster, featured on the March 1994 cover of Smithsonian magazine. That image, she thought, resembled the woman at the lathe — and therefore resembled her.

By the end of the 1990s, the news media was identifying Mrs. Doyle as the inspiration for Mr. Miller’s Rosie. There the matter would very likely have rested, had it not been for Dr. Kimble’s curiosity.

It was not Mrs. Doyle’s claim per se that he found suspect: As he emphasized in the Times interview, she had made it in good faith.

What nettled him was the news media’s unquestioning reiteration of that claim. He embarked on a six-year odyssey to identify the woman at the lathe, and to determine whether that image had influenced Mr. Miller’s poster.

In the end, his detective work disclosed that the lathe worker was Naomi Parker Fraley.

The third of eight children of Joseph Parker, a mining engineer, and the former Esther Leis, a homemaker, Naomi Fern Parker was born in Tulsa, Okla., on Aug. 26, 1921. The family moved wherever Mr. Parker’s work took him, living in New York, Missouri, Texas, Washington, Utah and California, where they settled in Alameda, near San Francisco.

After the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, the 20-year-old Naomi and her 18-year-old sister, Ada, went to work at the Naval Air Station in Alameda. They were assigned to the machine shop, where their duties included drilling, patching airplane wings and, fittingly, riveting.

It was there that the Acme photographer captured Naomi Parker, her hair tied in a bandanna for safety, at her lathe. She clipped the photo from the newspaper and kept it for decades.

After the war, she worked as a waitress at the Doll House, a restaurant in Palm Springs, Calif., popular with Hollywood stars. She married and had a family.

Years later, Mrs. Fraley encountered the Miller poster. “I did think it looked like me,” she told People, though she did not then connect it with the newspaper photo.

In 2011, Mrs. Fraley and her sister attended a reunion of female war workers at the Rosie the Riveter/World War II Home Front National Historical Park in Richmond, Calif. There, prominently displayed, was a photo of the woman at the lathe — captioned as Geraldine Doyle.

“I couldn’t believe it,” Ms. Fraley told The Oakland Tribune in 2016. “I knew it was actually me in the photo.”

She wrote to the National Park Service, which administers the site. In reply, she received a letter asking for her help in determining “the true identity of the woman in the photograph.”

“As one might imagine,” Dr. Kimble wrote in 2016, Mrs. Fraley “was none too pleased to find that her identity was under dispute.”

As he searched for the woman at the lathe, Dr. Kimble scoured the internet, books, old newspapers and photo archives for a captioned copy of the image.

At last he found a copy from a vintage-photo dealer. It carried the photographer’s original caption, with the date — March 24, 1942 — and the location, Alameda.

Best of all was this line:

“Pretty Naomi Parker looks like she might catch her nose in the turret lathe she is operating.”

Dr. Kimble located Mrs. Fraley and her sister, Ada Wyn Parker Loy, then living together in Cottonwood, Calif. He visited them in 2015, whereupon Mrs. Fraley produced the cherished newspaper photo she had saved all those years.

“There is no question that she is the ‘lathe woman’ in the photograph,” Dr. Kimble said.

An essential question remained: Did that photograph influence Mr. Miller’s poster?

As Dr. Kimble emphasized, the connection is not conclusive: Mr. Miller left no heirs, and his personal papers are silent on the subject. But there is, he said, suggestive circumstantial evidence.

“The timing is pretty good,” he explained. “The poster appears in Westinghouse factories in February 1943. Presumably they’re created weeks, possibly months, ahead of time. So I imagine Miller’s working on it in the summer and fall of 1942.”

As Dr. Kimble also learned, the lathe photo was published in The Pittsburgh Press, in Mr. Miller’s hometown, on July 5, 1942. “So Miller very easily could have seen it,” he said.

Then there is the telltale polka-dot head scarf, and Mrs. Fraley’s resemblance to the Rosie of the poster. “We can rule her in as a good candidate for having inspired the poster,” Dr. Kimble said.

Mrs. Fraley’s first marriage, to Joseph Blankenship, ended in divorce; her second, to John Muhlig, ended with his death in 1971. Her third husband, Charles Fraley, whom she married in 1979, died in 1998.

Her survivors include a son, Joseph Blankenship; four stepsons, Ernest, Daniel, John and Michael Fraley; two stepdaughters, Patricia Hood and Ann Fraley; two sisters, Mrs. Loy and Althea Hill; three grandchildren; three great-grandchildren; and many step-grandchildren and step-great-grandchildren.

Her death was confirmed by her daughter-in-law, Marnie Blankenship.

If Dr. Kimble exercised all due scholarly caution in identifying Mrs. Fraley as the inspiration for “We Can Do It!,” her views on the subject were unequivocal.

Interviewing Mrs. Fraley in 2016, The World-Herald asked her how it felt to be known publicly as Rosie the Riveter.

“Victory!” she cried. “Victory! Victory!”

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  #647  
Old 01-29-2018, 03:47 AM
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Mort Walker, The Man Behind 'Beetle Bailey' Comic Strip, Dies At 94
CHRIS BENDEREV January 28, 20188:23 PM ET



Mort Walker, the renowned comic strip artist best known for his cartoon depicting the high jinks of the loafing Army private "Beetle Bailey," died Saturday at the age of 94 at his home in Stamford, Conn.

Walker drew Beetle Bailey as a daily comic strip for 68 years, making him the longest-running artist in the medium's history, according to a statement from King Features, which performed the original syndication for the strip.

Beetle Bailey eventually ran in 1,800 newspapers across more than 50 countries, accumulating a daily readership of 200 million.

Beetle Bailey was not Walker's lone creation. He also crafted Hi and Lois with Dik Browne in 1954, Sam's Strip in 1961, Boner's Ark in 1968, among others.

His most beloved character's first incarnation was behind another name. The languorous, young man with a hat perennially drooping over his forehead began as "Spider" the college student.

But with the onset of the Korean War, Walker — who later described his four years of conscription during World War II as "free research" — altered the setting of his comic. Beetle Bailey was now an ineffectual Army private who was invariably content to shirk responsibility and resist the authority figures at Camp Swampy.

The rest of the cast included the flailing Gen. Halftrack, his shapely secretary Miss Buxley, Cookie the chef and buck-toothed Private Zero.

Beetle Bailey had earned modest circulation until the early 1950s when the Tokyo edition of Stars & Stripes banned it out of fear it would encourage service members to model Bailey's lackadaisical behavior. The ban backfired, leading to a massive wave of publicity and a surge in distribution for the comic strip.

In the 1970's, against the advice of his publisher, Walker added a black character to the team: Lt. Flap, who sported an Afro and a goatee and first appeared with the line: "How come there's no blacks in this honkie outfit?!" The new character again sent circulation soaring.

In 1997, facing criticism over the way in which Gen. Halftrack continually leered at his secretary, Miss Buxley, Walker introduced a new story line: the general was now forced to undergo sensitivity training.

In 2000 the Army invited Walker to the Pentagon to be awarded The Decoration for Distinguished Civilian Service.

Although Walker never quit his work, he did bring in collaborators, including his two sons Brian and Greg, who say they intend to help the comic live on.

In 1974 he founded the Museum of Cartoon Art in Greenwich, Conn., the first of its kind. Although the collection grew, funding problems ensued and after shifting the location a number of times, the museum was closed in 2002. However, in 2008 the collection was transferred to a gallery in Ohio State University's Billy Ireland Cartoon Library and Museum.

Addison Morton Walker was born in El Dorado, Kan. in 1923 — his father an architect and his mother a newspaper illustrator. He recognized his passion for cartoons at a young age. He had already sold 300 cartoons by the age of 15.

Much later in his life he was quoted as saying: "I'm thankful for the good life cartooning has given me."

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  #648  
Old 02-05-2018, 07:19 PM
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Dennis Edwards, Temptations Singer, Dies at 74
1:29 PM PST 2/2/2018 by Winston Cook-Wilson, Spin




The singer passed away at his home in Chicago on Friday.

Dennis Edwards, the Detroit singer who replaced David Ruffin as lead singer of The Temptations in 1968, has passed away at the age of 74.

Edwards died at his home in Chicago today, Feb. 2, according to reports from his family and CBS Chicago.

Edwards began his career as lead singer of another Motown group, The Contours, before being called in to replace Ruffin after the singer’s fallout with the group.

Edwards’ voice defined the sound of The Temptations through their funkiest period, in which he sang lead on major hits like “I Can’t Get Next to You,” “Papa Was a Rolling Stone,” “Cloud Nine,” and “Ball of Confusion (That’s What the World Is Today).”

He remained at the head of the group through 1977 when the group left Motown Records. Upon their return to the label in 1980, Edwards was reinstated.

He also released three solo albums, and his 1984 Motown debut Don’t Look Any Further and its title track reached the top 5 of the Billboard R&B charts.

Edwards continued to perform Temptations material as part of splinter group The Temptations Revue Featuring Dennis Edwards up until last year.

This article first appeared on Spin.com.

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  #649  
Old 02-06-2018, 09:46 AM
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John Mahoney, actor on "Fraiser"



John Mahoney, a veteran character actor best known for playing the curmudgeonly dog-loving father of the title character in TV's "Frasier," has died.
He was 77 years old.


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Old 04-04-2018, 12:26 AM
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Toys 'R' Us founder Charles Lazarus dies days after the chain says it's closing
by Chris Isidore and Julia Horowitz @CNNMoney
March 23, 2018: 9:30 AM ET



Charles Lazarus, who founded Toys "R" Us 70 years ago, died Thursday, a week after the company announced it will be forced to shut down its U.S. operations.
Lazarus, 94, no longer held a stake in the chain. He started the company in 1948 when he was 25, anticipating that the post-war baby boom would create demand for baby supplies and toys. He remained CEO until 1994.

"He was the father of the toy business," said Michael Goldstein, who succeed him as CEO. "He knew the toys and loved the toys and loved the kids who would shop in the stores. His face lit up when he watched kids playing with toys."

"There have been many sad moments for Toys "R" Us in recent weeks, and none more heartbreaking than today's news about the passing of our beloved founder," Toys "R" Us said in a statement.

"He visited us in New Jersey just last year, and we will forever be grateful for his positive energy, passion for the customer and love for children everywhere. Our thoughts and prayers are with Charles' family and loved ones."

He started selling baby furniture in a store called Children's Bargain Town in Washington, D.C. But he quickly expanded to selling toys.

There have been many sad moments for Toys"R"Us in recent weeks, and none more heartbreaking than today's news about the passing of our beloved founder, Charles Lazarus. Our thoughts and

prayers are with Charles' family and loved ones. — ToysRUs (@ToysRUs) March 22, 2018

In 1957, Lazarus opened his first store stocked only with toys. It was modeled after a supermarket, with a wide assortment of items stocked high on shelves. He named it Toys "R" Us — with a backwards "R" in the logo that was supposed to look like it was drawn by a kid. Its iconic giraffe mascot, started as part of advertisements for Children's Bargain Town. Its name was changed from "Geoffrey" in 1965 and soon became the center of its marketing campaign.

But the company faced growing competition from big box retailers such as Walmart (WMT) and Target (TGT) as it encountered other challenges.
Its debt was downgraded to junk bond status in January of 2005. A year later the company was sold for $6.6 billion to a group of private equity firms -- KKR, Bain Capital and real estate firm Vornado.

The deal left it saddled with $5.3 billion in debt and it never really recovered from that.

--CNN's Parija Kavilanz contributed to this story.

Correction: An earlier version of this story misstated the day Charles Lazarus died.
The company went public in 1978 and thrived in the years that followed, growing from a $1 billion in the early 1990's to an $11 billion business.

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